Caffeine effects on sleep taken 0, 3, or 6 hours before going to bed.

@article{Drake2013CaffeineEO,
  title={Caffeine effects on sleep taken 0, 3, or 6 hours before going to bed.},
  author={Christopher L. Drake and Timothy Roehrs and John R. Shambroom and Thomas Roth},
  journal={Journal of clinical sleep medicine : JCSM : official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine},
  year={2013},
  volume={9 11},
  pages={
          1195-200
        }
}
  • C. DrakeT. Roehrs T. Roth
  • Published 15 November 2013
  • Medicine
  • Journal of clinical sleep medicine : JCSM : official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine
STUDY OBJECTIVE Sleep hygiene recommendations are widely disseminated despite the fact that few systematic studies have investigated the empirical bases of sleep hygiene in the home environment. [] Key Method Sleep disturbance was also monitored objectively using a validated portable sleep monitor. RESULTS Results demonstrated a moderate dose of caffeine at bedtime, 3 hours prior to bedtime, or 6 hours prior to bedtime each have significant effects on sleep disturbance relative to placebo (p < 0.05 for all…

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