Caffeine and the central nervous system: mechanisms of action, biochemical, metabolic and psychostimulant effects

@article{Nehlig1992CaffeineAT,
  title={Caffeine and the central nervous system: mechanisms of action, biochemical, metabolic and psychostimulant effects},
  author={Astrid Nehlig and Jean-Luc Daval and G{\'e}rard Debry},
  journal={Brain Research Reviews},
  year={1992},
  volume={17},
  pages={139-170}
}
Caffeine is the most widely consumed central-nervous-system stimulant. Three main mechanisms of action of caffeine on the central nervous system have been described. Mobilization of intracellular calcium and inhibition of specific phosphodiesterases only occur at high non-physiological concentrations of caffeine. The only likely mechanism of action of the methylxanthine is the antagonism at the level of adenosine receptors. Caffeine increases energy metabolism throughout the brain but decreases… Expand
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