Cabergoline in the treatment of early parkinson's disease

@article{Rinne1997CabergolineIT,
  title={Cabergoline in the treatment of early parkinson's disease},
  author={Urpo K. Rinne and Fulvio Bracco and Carlos Chouza and E. Dupont and Oscar S. Gershanik and Jose Felix Marti Masso and Jean-Louis Montastruc and C. David Marsden and Antonella Dubini and N. Orlando and Roberto Grimaldi},
  journal={Neurology},
  year={1997},
  volume={48},
  pages={363 - 368}
}
Article abstract-Cabergoline is a potent D2 receptor agonist with a half-life of 65 hours that may provide continuous dopaminergic stimulation administered once daily. In this study, we randomized de novo Parkinson's disease (PD) patients to treatment with increasing doses of cabergoline (0.25 to 4 mg/d) or levodopa (100 to 600 mg/d) up to the optimal or maximum tolerated dose. Decreases of >30% in motor disability (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Factor III) versus baseline were… 

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