CRUSHING INJURIES TO THE SKULL: CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL OBSERVATIONS

@article{Russell1949CRUSHINGIT,
  title={CRUSHING INJURIES TO THE SKULL: CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL OBSERVATIONS},
  author={William Ritchie Russell and Filmore Schiller},
  journal={Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery \& Psychiatry},
  year={1949},
  volume={12},
  pages={52 - 60}
}
Severe crushing injuries of the head are often fatal, but in those patients who survive this form of injury the absence or slight degree of concussion is usually a striking feature of the clinical picture. Even though the skull may be fractured and the cranial nerves injured, the patient often remains fully conscious. This clinical observation led one of us (W.R.R.). with Denny-Brown (1941) to investigate experimentally the mechanism ofcerebral concussion, and we found, as might be expected… 

Bitemporal head crush injuries: clinical and radiological features of a distinctive type of head injury.

The association of clinical, endocrine, and neuroimaging findings encountered in this peculiar type of head injury supports the idea that this subset of injured patients has a distinctive clinical condition, namely the syndrome of bitemporal crush injury to the head.

Pediatric crushing head injury: biomechanics and clinical features of an uncommon type of craniocerebral trauma

The observed skull, brain, and cranial nerve lesions corresponded to a mechanism of bilateral compression of the children’s heads mainly occasioned by a static load, although an associated component of dynamic forces was also involved.

Head Trauma Model Systems

The Latin origin of the term concussion, concutere, commonly referred to a violent shaking or agitation, as in an earthquake. The first recorded use of the term in a clinical context dates from the

Clinical analysis of seven patients of crushing head injury.

This injury actually has seldom been countered in daily practice and clinical manifestation and neuroimaging have characteristic features, and the prognosis of CHI may be polarized to fatal or excellent, and depends on whether the cranium and brain itself can tolerate the applied force.

CRANIAL NERVE AVULSION AND OTHER NEURAL INJURIES IN ROAD ACCIDENTS

  • J. Heinze
  • Medicine
    The Medical journal of Australia
  • 1969
Post–mortem examinations were conducted in 21 cases of fatal road trauma, and damage was found in the second, third, fourth and sixth cranial nerves, the chiasm, and the extraocular muscles. In

Crush Head Injuries in Infants and Young Children: Neurologic and Neuropsychologic Sequelae

Neuropsychologic outcome after brain injury produced by static loading of the head is more favorable than from traumatic brain injury associated with dynamic loading.

Post-traumatic amnesia in closed head injury.

Limits and sources of ambiguity are defined in the use of PTA as an index of severity of brain damage and a preliminary report of significant representative findings in a study of 1,766 patients is presented.

Neuropsychological Assessment and Treatment of Head Trauma Patients

Head trauma remains the third leading cause of death in the United States and is two thirds more common in males, with 90% of the head injuries occurring in individuals under 45 years of age.

Pathology of head trauma.

Characteristics and Prediction of Cranial Crush Injuries in Children *†

It is indicated that quasi‐static bilateral loading of the cranium may lead to predictable fracture of the basicranium and prefailure stress field diagrams may predict fracture propagation paths, although these will not be exact.
...

References

SHOWING 1-6 OF 6 REFERENCES

The Lucite Calvarium—A Method for Direct Observation of the Brain: II. Cranial Trauma and Brain Movement

The patterns of brain motion resulting from blows to both the freely movable and the immobile head were recorded by high-speed cinematography.

Experimental cerebral concussion.

Re-investigation of the phenomenon in cats under nembutal anaesthesia confirms its appearance in severe degree, and ability to result in death, without macroscopic lesions of the brain stem.

Published by http://jnnp.bmj.com/ Downloaded from OBSERVATIONS EXPERIMENTAL SKULL: CLINICAL AND CRUSHING INJURIES TO

  • Traumatismes Cranio-CUr6braux."
  • 1943

Traumatismes Cranio-CUr6braux

  • Part II
  • 1919