COVID-19 reinfection: a rapid systematic review of case reports and case series

@article{Wang2021COVID19RA,
  title={COVID-19 reinfection: a rapid systematic review of case reports and case series},
  author={Jingzhou Wang and Christopher Kaperak and Toshiro Sato and Atsushi Sakuraba},
  journal={Journal of Investigative Medicine},
  year={2021},
  volume={69},
  pages={1253 - 1255}
}
The COVID-19 pandemic has infected millions of people worldwide and many countries have been suffering from a large number of deaths. Acknowledging the ability of SARS-CoV-2 to mutate into distinct strains as an RNA virus and investigating its potential to cause reinfection is important for future health policy guidelines. It was thought that individuals who recovered from COVID-19 generate a robust immune response and develop protective immunity; however, since the first case of documented… 
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