COVID-19 lockdowns cause global air pollution declines

@article{Venter2020COVID19LC,
  title={COVID-19 lockdowns cause global air pollution declines},
  author={Zander S. Venter and Kristin Aunan and Sourangsu Chowdhury and Jos Lelieveld},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  year={2020},
  volume={117},
  pages={18984 - 18990}
}
Significance The global response to the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in unprecedented reductions in economic activity. We find that, after accounting for meteorological variations, lockdown events have reduced the population-weighted concentration of nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter levels by about 60% and 31% in 34 countries, with mixed effects on ozone. Reductions in transportation sector emissions are largely responsible for the NO2 anomalies. The lockdown response to coronavirus… Expand
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