COURTSHIP AND SPERM TRANSFER IN THE WHIP SPIDER PHRYNUS GERVAISII (AMBLYPYGI, PHRYNIDAE): A COMPLEMENT TO WEYGOLDT'S 1977 PAPER

@inproceedings{Peretti2002COURTSHIPAS,
  title={COURTSHIP AND SPERM TRANSFER IN THE WHIP SPIDER PHRYNUS GERVAISII (AMBLYPYGI, PHRYNIDAE): A COMPLEMENT TO WEYGOLDT'S 1977 PAPER},
  author={Alfredo Vicente Peretti},
  year={2002}
}
Abstract The aim of this study was to provide descriptive and quantitative data regarding behaviors involved in courtship and in sperm transfer of the whip spider Phrynus gervaisii (Pocock 1894) in order to complete the previous description for this same species given by P. Weygoldt. The specimens were captured in anthills of Paraponera clavata, on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. Ten courtship and five sperm transfer sequences were recorded. Four out of five mating sequences with sperm transfer… Expand
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