COUNTERACTING SELECTIVE REGIMES AND HOST PREFERENCE EVOLUTION IN ECOTYPES OF TWO SPECIES OF WALKING‐STICKS

@article{Sandoval2005COUNTERACTINGSR,
  title={COUNTERACTING SELECTIVE REGIMES AND HOST PREFERENCE EVOLUTION IN ECOTYPES OF TWO SPECIES OF WALKING‐STICKS},
  author={Cristina P. Sandoval and Patrik Nosil},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={2005},
  volume={59}
}
Abstract The evolution of ecological specialization has been a central topic in ecology because specialized adaptations to divergent environments can result in reproductive isolation and facilitate speciation. However, the order in which different aspects of habitat adaptation and habitat preference evolve is unclear. Timema walking‐stick insects feed and mate on the host plants on which they rest. Previous studies of T. cristinae ecotypes have documented divergent, host‐specific selection from… 
The evolution of host preference in allopatric vs. parapatric populations of Timema cristinae walking‐sticks
TLDR
Host preferences led to levels of premating isolation between populations using alternate hosts that were comparable in magnitude to previously documented premates isolation caused by natural and sexual selection against migrants between hosts.
Sexual dimorphism dominates divergent host plant use in stick insect trophic morphology
TLDR
The results show that trophic morphology does not strongly contribute to host-adapted ecotype divergence in T. cristinae and that traits can respond to complex selection regimes by diverging along different intraspecific lines, thereby impeding progress toward speciation.
Natural selection and divergence in mate preference during speciation
TLDR
Understanding of the evolution of sexual isolation can be enhanced by isolating the roles of diverse ecological and evolutionary processes, and it is shown that sexual isolation involves, at least in part, olfactory communication.
Host shifts and signal divergence: mating signals covary with host use in a complex of specialized plant‐feeding insects
TLDR
The hypothesis that hosts shifts have led to speciation in the Enchenopa binotata species complex of treehoppers in part through their influence on divergence in mate communication systems is supported.
Specialization, Speciation, and Radiation: The Evolutionary Biology of Herbivorous Insects
TLDR
This work discusses coevolution, Cryptic Speciation, and the Persistence of Plant-Insect Interactions, which has implications for conservation of Coevolved Insect Herbivores and Plants.
The role of selection and gene flow in the evolution of sexual isolation in Timema walking sticks and other Orthopteroids
TLDR
Variation among groups might reflect the degree to which different groups are intimately associated with their food resources, the types of traits used in mate choice, and how the geographic arrangement of populations affects the opportunity for reinforcement.
Divergent Host Plant Adaptation and Reproductive Isolation between Ecotypes of Timema cristinae Walking Sticks
  • P. Nosil
  • Biology, Medicine
    The American Naturalist
  • 2007
TLDR
This work synthesizes studies of Timema cristinae host plant ecotypes to compare the magnitude of multiple reproductive barriers among different ecological and geographic scenarios and revealed that divergent host adaptation can promote the evolution of diverse reproductive barriers, including those that are not inherently ecological.
MULTITRAIT, HOST‐ASSOCIATED DIVERGENCE AMONG SETS OF BUTTERFLY POPULATIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION AND ECOLOGICAL SPECIATION
  • M. Singer, C. McBride
  • Biology, Medicine
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 2010
TLDR
It is suggested that adaptation to Collinsia is incompatible with adaptation to other hosts and may generate extrinsic postzygotic reproductive isolation among populations, and adoption of Collinsia as a host may lead to allopatric ecological speciation.
Parallel Patterns of Morphological and Behavioral Variation among Host-Associated Populations of Two Gall Wasp Species
TLDR
Evidence is presented of parallel patterns of morphological and behavioral variation among host-associated populations of two species of cynipid gall wasps that each exhibit a life cycle intimately tied to the same two host plant environments, Quercus geminata and Q. virginiana.
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