CORE NETWORKS, SOCIAL ISOLATION, AND NEW MEDIA

@article{Hampton2011CORENS,
  title={CORE NETWORKS, SOCIAL ISOLATION, AND NEW MEDIA},
  author={Keith N. Hampton and Lauren F. Sessions and Eun Ja Her},
  journal={Information, Communication \& Society},
  year={2011},
  volume={14},
  pages={130 - 155}
}
Evidence from the US General Social Surveys (GSS) suggests that during the past 20 years, people have become increasingly socially isolated and their core discussion networks have become smaller and less diverse. One explanation offered for this trend is the use of mobile phones and the Internet. This study reports on the findings of a 2008 survey that replicates and expands on the GSS network methodology to explore the relationship between the use of new technologies and the size and diversity… 
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