COOPERATIVE MODEL OF BACTERIAL SENSING

@article{Shi1998COOPERATIVEMO,
  title={COOPERATIVE MODEL OF BACTERIAL SENSING},
  author={Yu Shi and Thomas A. J. Duke},
  journal={Physical Review E},
  year={1998},
  volume={58},
  pages={6399-6406}
}
  • Yu Shi, T. Duke
  • Published 1 November 1998
  • Chemistry, Physics, Biology
  • Physical Review E
Bacterial chemotaxis is controlled by the signaling of a cluster of receptors. A cooperative model is presented, in which coupling between neighboring receptor dimers enhances the sensitivity with which stimuli can be detected, without diminishing the range of chemoeffector concentration over which chemotaxis can operate. Individual receptor dimers have two stable conformational states: one active, one inactive. Noise gives rise to a distribution between these states, with the probability… Expand
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