• Corpus ID: 189800542

COMPARISON OF THE REPRODUCTIVE INVESTMENT IN COCCIDOPHAGOUS AND APHIDOPHAGOUS LADYBIRDS ( COLEOPTERA : COCCINELLIDAE )

@inproceedings{Magro2006COMPARISONOT,
  title={COMPARISON OF THE REPRODUCTIVE INVESTMENT IN COCCIDOPHAGOUS AND APHIDOPHAGOUS LADYBIRDS ( COLEOPTERA : COCCINELLIDAE )},
  author={Alexandra Magro and Jean-Louis Hemptinne and Anthony F. G. Dixon and Magro and J.-L. and Hemptinne and A. M. and Ventura},
  year={2006}
}
MAGRO, A., J-L. HEMPTINNE, A. NAVARRE & A.F.G. DIXON 2003. Comparison of the reproductive investment in Coccidophagous and Aphidophagous ladybirds (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). Pp. 29-31 in A.O. SOARES, M.A. VENTURA, V. GARCIA & J.-L. HEMPTINNE (Eds) 2003. Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium on Ecology of Aphidophaga: Biology, Ecology and Behaviour of Aphidophagous Insects. Arquipélago. Life and Marine Sciences. Supplement 5: x + 112 pp. 
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