COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY OF SWEATING

@article{Jenkinson1973COMPARATIVEPO,
  title={COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY OF SWEATING},
  author={David McEwan Jenkinson},
  journal={British Journal of Dermatology},
  year={1973},
  volume={88}
}
  • D. Jenkinson
  • Published 1973
  • Biology, Medicine
  • British Journal of Dermatology
In the following short review an attempt has been made to collate recent work on the sweat glands of different species. Information on these glands is, however, limited and it has been necessary to generalize from sparse evidence; most of the physiological information, for example, has been obtained from study of domestic and only a few wild animals. It is hoped, however, that, in spite of the dangers of generalization, by presenting the available data in comparative terms it will provoke… Expand

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  • Biology, Medicine
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  • Chemistry, Medicine
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The microcirculation and sweating in isolated perfused horse and ox skin
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Ultrastructure of the secretory epithelium, nerve fibers, and capillaries in the mouse sweat gland
The ultrastructure of the mouse sweat gland was examined, in support of neurological studies of sweat glands and their relationships to the autonomic nervous system. It was found that the mouse sweatExpand
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