• Corpus ID: 127047896

COMPARATIVE ECOLOGY OF THE INVASIVE RUBUS PHOENICOLASIUS AND THE NATIVE RUBUS ARGUTUS

@inproceedings{Innis2005COMPARATIVEEO,
  title={COMPARATIVE ECOLOGY OF THE INVASIVE RUBUS PHOENICOLASIUS AND THE NATIVE RUBUS ARGUTUS},
  author={Anne F. Innis},
  year={2005}
}
  • A. Innis
  • Published 26 May 2005
  • Environmental Science
Title of Dissertation: COMPARATIVE ECOLOGY OF THE INVASIVE RUBUS PHOENICOLASIUS AND THE NATIVE RUBUS ARGUTUS. Anne Foss Innis, Doctor of Philosophy, 2005 Dissertation directed by: Associate Professor Irwin N. Forseth Department of Biology Invasive species are one of the most significant factors in human influenced global change. Management actions that prevent the spread and impacts of invasive species require knowledge of their ecological characteristics. The characteristics of the invasive… 

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