COLONIZATION HISTORY AND POPULATION GENETICS OF THE COLOR‐POLYMORPHIC HAWAIIAN HAPPY‐FACE SPIDER THERIDION GRALLATOR (ARANEAE, THERIDIIDAE)

@article{Croucher2012COLONIZATIONHA,
  title={COLONIZATION HISTORY AND POPULATION GENETICS OF THE COLOR‐POLYMORPHIC HAWAIIAN HAPPY‐FACE SPIDER THERIDION GRALLATOR (ARANEAE, THERIDIIDAE)},
  author={Peter J. P. Croucher and Geoff S. Oxford and Athena Wai Lam and Neesha Mody and Rosemary G. Gillespie},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={2012},
  volume={66}
}
Past geological and climatological processes shape extant biodiversity. In the Hawaiian Islands, these processes have provided the physical environment for a number of extensive adaptive radiations. Yet, single species that occur throughout the islands provide some of the best cases for understanding how species respond to the shifting dynamics of the islands in the context of colonization history and associated demographic and adaptive shifts. Here, we focus on the Hawaiian happy‐face spider… 
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