CO2 leaking from sub-seabed storage: Responses of two marine bacteria strains.

@article{BorreroSantiago2016CO2LF,
  title={CO2 leaking from sub-seabed storage: Responses of two marine bacteria strains.},
  author={A. R. Borrero-Santiago and M. Carb{\'u} and T. A. DelValls and I. Riba},
  journal={Marine environmental research},
  year={2016},
  volume={121},
  pages={
          2-8
        }
}
Carbon capture and storage (CCS) in stable geological locations is one of the options to mitigate the negative effects of global warming produced by the increase in CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. A CO2 leak is one of the risks associated with this strategy. Marine bacteria attached to the sediment may be affected by an acidification event. Responses of two marine strains (Roseobacter sp. CECT 7117 and Pseudomonas litoralis CECT 7670) were assessed under different scenarios using a range… Expand
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