Corpus ID: 27569857

CO-EVOLUTION OF NEOCORTEX SIZE , GROUP SIZE AND LANGUAGE IN HUMANS

@inproceedings{Dunbar2008COEVOLUTIONON,
  title={CO-EVOLUTION OF NEOCORTEX SIZE , GROUP SIZE AND LANGUAGE IN HUMANS},
  author={R. Dunbar},
  year={2008}
}
Group size is a function of relative neocortical volume in nonhuman primates. Extrapolation from this regression equation yields a predicted group size for modern humans very similar to that of certain hunter-gatherer and traditional horticulturalist societies. Groups of similar size are also found in other large-scale forms of contemporary and historical society. Among primates, the cohesion of groups is maintained by social grooming; the time devoted to social grooming is linearly related to… Expand
The Social Brain
Evolution of brain size and juvenile periods in primates.
Bridging the bonding gap: the transition from primates to humans
  • R. Dunbar
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2012
Group size in social-ecological systems
Toward an experimental exploration of the complexity of human social interactions
Social cognition on the Internet: testing constraints on social network size
  • R. Dunbar
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2012
The complex structure of hunter–gatherer social networks
Gossip, Conversation and Group Size: Language as a Bonding Mechanism
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 89 REFERENCES
Neocortex size as a constraint on group size in primates
Neocortical development and social structure in primates
On the evolution of Ape Social Systems
Lemur Social Behavior and Primate Intelligence
The similarity principle underlying social bonding among female rhesus monkeys.
Functional significance of social grooming in primates
Primates, brains and ecology
Primate social systems
How vervet monkeys perceive their grunts: Field playback experiments
...
1
2
3
4
5
...