• Corpus ID: 27569857

CO-EVOLUTION OF NEOCORTEX SIZE , GROUP SIZE AND LANGUAGE IN HUMANS

@inproceedings{Dunbar2008COEVOLUTIONON,
  title={CO-EVOLUTION OF NEOCORTEX SIZE , GROUP SIZE AND LANGUAGE IN HUMANS},
  author={Robin I. M. Dunbar},
  year={2008}
}
Group size is a function of relative neocortical volume in nonhuman primates. Extrapolation from this regression equation yields a predicted group size for modern humans very similar to that of certain hunter-gatherer and traditional horticulturalist societies. Groups of similar size are also found in other large-scale forms of contemporary and historical society. Among primates, the cohesion of groups is maintained by social grooming; the time devoted to social grooming is linearly related to… 

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