CLIMATE AND NET CARBON AVAILABILITY DETERMINE TEMPORAL PATTERNS OF SEED PRODUCTION BY NOTHOFAGUS

@article{Richardson2005CLIMATEAN,
  title={CLIMATE AND NET CARBON AVAILABILITY DETERMINE TEMPORAL PATTERNS OF SEED PRODUCTION BY NOTHOFAGUS},
  author={Sarah J. Richardson and Robert B. Allen and David Whitehead and Fiona E. Carswell and Wendy A. Ruscoe and Kevin H. Platt},
  journal={Ecology},
  year={2005},
  volume={86},
  pages={972-981}
}
We analyzed seed production of mountain beech (Nothofagus solandri var. cliffortioides) forest along an elevational gradient in New Zealand from 1020 to 1370 m (treeline) for the years 1973-2002. We used seed production data from nine elevations and a site- and species-specific net carbon (C) availability model from two elevations (1050 m and 1340 m) to examine how three variables (temperature, soil moisture, and net C avail- ability) during three key periods (resource priming, flowering… 

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