Corpus ID: 50463726

CHANGE AND COMMUNICATOR-COMMUNICATES SIMILARITY AND DISSIMILARITY

@inproceedings{Berscheid2005CHANGEAC,
  title={CHANGE AND COMMUNICATOR-COMMUNICATES SIMILARITY AND DISSIMILARITY},
  author={E. Berscheid},
  year={2005}
}
Investigations of similarity and opinion change seem to have inadvertently fostered the conclusion that any communicator-communicatee similarity will lead to opinion change, and that the resultant change is due directly to similarity and not to increased feelings of attractiveness for similar communicators. It was hypothesized and confirmed that, when communicator attractiveness is controlled, communicator-communicatee similarities which are relevant to the communicator's influence attempt… Expand

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