CAROTENOID PIGMENTS IN A MUTANT CARDINAL: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE GENETIC AND ENZYMATIC CONTROL MECHANISMS OF CAROTENOID METABOLISM IN BIRDS

@inproceedings{McGraw2003CAROTENOIDPI,
  title={CAROTENOID PIGMENTS IN A MUTANT CARDINAL: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE GENETIC AND ENZYMATIC CONTROL MECHANISMS OF CAROTENOID METABOLISM IN BIRDS},
  author={Kevin J. McGraw and Geoffrey E. Hill and Robert S. Parker},
  year={2003}
}
Abstract Birds that use carotenoids to color their feathers must ultimately obtain these pigments from the diet, but they are also capable of metabolically transforming dietary carotenoids into alternate forms that they use as plumage colorants. The genetic and enzymatic control mechanisms underlying carotenoid metabolism are poorly understood. We investigated carotenoid pigments present in the feathers of an aberrantly colored yellow Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) to determine how… 

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