CAN GENE FLOW PREVENT REINFORCEMENT?

@article{Sanderson1989CANGF,
  title={CAN GENE FLOW PREVENT REINFORCEMENT?},
  author={Neil Sanderson},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={1989},
  volume={43}
}
  • N. Sanderson
  • Published 1 September 1989
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution
A model of reinforcement in a hybrid zone is developed in which an allele causing reinforcement may only be favored in the center of the hybrid zone and is selected against elsewhere. When reinforcement is favored only in the hybrid zone, the swamping effect of gene flow severely impedes the evolution of reinforcement: reinforcement can only occur when β < sγ2/4 (s is selection against hybrids, γ is the strength of reinforcement, and β is the strength of selection against reinforcement… Expand

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