CALIBRATED DIVERSITY, TREE TOPOLOGY AND THE MOTHER OF MASS EXTINCTIONS: THE LESSON OF TEMNOSPONDYLS

@article{Ruta2008CALIBRATEDDT,
  title={CALIBRATED DIVERSITY, TREE TOPOLOGY AND THE MOTHER OF MASS EXTINCTIONS: THE LESSON OF TEMNOSPONDYLS},
  author={Marcello Ruta and Michael J. Benton},
  journal={Palaeontology},
  year={2008},
  volume={51}
}
  • M. Ruta, M. Benton
  • Published 1 November 2008
  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • Palaeontology
Abstract:  Three family‐level cladistic analyses of temnospondyl amphibians are used to evaluate the impact of taxonomic rank, tree topology, and sample size on diversity profiles, origination and extinction rates, and faunal turnover. Temnospondyls are used as a case study for investigating replacement of families across the Permo‐Triassic boundary and modality of recovery in the aftermath of the end‐Permian mass extinction. Both observed and inferred (i.e. tree topology‐dependent) values of… 

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