C-reactive protein and other circulating markers of inflammation in the prediction of coronary heart disease.

@article{Danesh2004CreactivePA,
  title={C-reactive protein and other circulating markers of inflammation in the prediction of coronary heart disease.},
  author={John Danesh and Jeremy G. Wheeler and Gideon M. Hirschfield and Shinichi Eda and Gudny Eiriksdottir and Ann Rumley and Gordon D. O. Lowe and Mark B. Pepys and Vilmundur G. Gudnason},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2004},
  volume={350 14},
  pages={
          1387-97
        }
}
BACKGROUND C-reactive protein is an inflammatory marker believed to be of value in the prediction of coronary events. We report data from a large study of C-reactive protein and other circulating inflammatory markers, as well as updated meta-analyses, to evaluate their relevance to the prediction of coronary heart disease. METHODS Measurements were made in samples obtained at base line from up to 2459 patients who had a nonfatal myocardial infarction or died of coronary heart disease during… 
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