Bypassing genomic imprinting allows seed development

@article{Nowack2007BypassingGI,
  title={Bypassing genomic imprinting allows seed development},
  author={Moritz K. Nowack and Reza Shirzadi and Nico Dissmeyer and Andreas Dolf and Elmar Endl and Paul E. Grini and Arp Schnittger},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2007},
  volume={447},
  pages={312-315}
}
In developing progeny of mammals the two parental genomes are differentially expressed according to imprinting marks, and embryos with only a uniparental genetic contribution die. Gene expression that is dependent on the parent of origin has also been observed in the offspring of flowering plants, and mutations in the imprinting machinery lead to embryonic lethality, primarily affecting the development of the endosperm—a structure in the seed that nourishes the embryo, analogous to the function… 
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This summary covers the achievements on Arabidopsis imprinted genes and will provide important information for studies on genomic imprinting in the important crops such as rice and maize.
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From the evolutionary point of view, lines of evidence suggest that both double fertilization and gene imprinting might have coevolved in flowering plants for their reproductive success.
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Results indicate that factors derived from the female gametophyte activate a subset of the paternal genome of fertilized seeds, including the ribosome protein gene RPS5a and the AMP deaminase gene FAC1, both of which are essential for early embryo and endosperm development.
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TLDR
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TLDR
It is demonstrated that AGL36 parent-of-origin–dependent expression is controlled by the activity of METHYLTRANSFERASE1 (MET1) maintenance DNA methyltransferase and DEMETER (DME) DNA glycosylase, revealing a new type of dual epigenetic regulation in seeds.
Cellular Programming of Plant Gene Imprinting
TLDR
Gene imprinting, the differential expression of maternal and paternal alleles, independently evolved in mammals and in flowering plants to prevent parthenogenetic development of the endosperm.
Natural Variation in the Degree of Autonomous Endosperm Formation Reveals Independence and Constraints of Embryo Growth During Seed Development in Arabidopsis thaliana
TLDR
It is demonstrated that there exists a large natural genetic variation with respect to the outcome of this signaling process in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and a genetic framework for dissection of the interplay between embryo and endosperm during seed growth in plants is provided.
Polycomb group proteins function in the female gametophyte to determine seed development in plants
TLDR
FIS-mediated expression patterns established in the female gametophyte can impact on seed development, establishing fis mutants as true female gamETophytic maternal-effect mutants.
An imprinted gene underlies postzygotic reproductive isolation in Arabidopsis thaliana.
TLDR
Evidence is presented that increased dosage of ADM causes triploid seed arrest and the molecular basis for the understanding of postzygotic hybridization barriers in plants is generated.
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