Bypass versus angioplasty in severe ischaemia of the leg (BASIL): multicentre, randomised controlled trial

@article{Bradbury2005BypassVA,
  title={Bypass versus angioplasty in severe ischaemia of the leg (BASIL): multicentre, randomised controlled trial},
  author={Andrew Bradbury},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2005},
  volume={366},
  pages={1925-1934}
}
BASIL trial participants* Summary Background The treatment of rest pain, ulceration, and gangrene of the leg (severe limb ischaemia) remains controversial. We instigated the BASIL trial to compare the outcome of bypass surgery and balloon angioplasty in such patients. Methods We randomly assigned 452 patients, who presented to 27 UK hospitals with severe limb ischaemia due to infra-inguinal disease, to receive a surgery-first (n=228) or an angioplasty-first (n=224) strategy. The primary… Expand
Bypass versus angioplasty in severe ischaemia of the leg (BASIL) trial: what are its implications?
TLDR
Analysis of the Bypass versus Angioplasty in Severe Ischaemia of the Leg trial shows that out to 2 years both strategies were associated with similar amputation-free and overall survival rates, as well as improvements in health-related quality of life. Expand
Bypass versus Angioplasty in Severe Ischaemia of the Leg (BASIL) and the (hoped for) dawn of evidence-based treatment for advanced limb ischemia.
  • M. Conte
  • Medicine
  • Journal of vascular surgery
  • 2010
TLDR
The BASIL trial confirms the primacy of open surgical bypass with vein for most patients with SLI and raises questions about the sequelae of failed endovascular interventions. Expand
Bypass versus Angioplasty in Severe Ischaemia of the Leg (BASIL) trial: A survival prediction model to facilitate clinical decision making.
TLDR
It may be possible to define the clinical and anatomic characteristics of SLI patients who are likely-and not likely-to live for >2 years after intervention as an aid to clinical decision making. Expand
Bypass versus Angioplasty in Severe Ischaemia of the Leg (BASIL) trial: Health-related quality of life outcomes, resource utilization, and cost-effectiveness analysis.
TLDR
Adopting a BSX-first strategy for patients with severe limb ischemia does result in a modest increase in hospital costs, with a small positive but insignificant gain in disease-specific and generic HRQOL. Expand
Comparison of Clinical Outcomes in Patients Selected for Infra-Popliteal Bypass or Plain Balloon Angioplasty for Chronic Limb Threatening Ischemia Between 2009 and 2013
TLDR
Current data support the BASIL-1 sub-group analysis which suggests that patients requiring revascularization for IP disease should have BS where possible and that PBA should usually be reserved for patients who are not suitable for BS. Expand
Comparison of Immediate and Long-term Outcomes in Men and Women Undergoing Revascularisation for Chronic Limb Threatening Ischaemia in the Bypass vs. Angioplasty in Severe Ischaemia of the Leg (BASIL-1) Trial.
TLDR
In the BASIL-1 trial, women had similar short term but better long term outcomes after revascularisation, and sex is an independent risk factor for outcomes followingrevascularisation as well as development of symptomatic PAD. Expand
Bypass surgery for chronic lower limb ischaemia.
TLDR
The quality of the evidence for the most important outcomes of bypass surgery versus PTA was high except for clinical improvement and primary patency, and for several outcomes, the CIs were wide. Expand
Role of Infrainguinal Angioplasty in the Treatment of Critical Limb Ischaemia
  • E. Eskelinen, M. Lepäntalo
  • Medicine
  • Scandinavian journal of surgery : SJS : official organ for the Finnish Surgical Society and the Scandinavian Surgical Society
  • 2007
TLDR
Data from the BASIL trial show the similar ability of bypass surgery and balloon angioplasty in preserving both life and limb in short term, while data from the MEDLINE and Cochrane library search show infrainguinal PTA is feasible in CLI patients. Expand
A Comparison of Clinical Outcomes Following Femoropopliteal Bypass or Plain Balloon Angioplasty with Selective Bare Metal Stenting in the Bypass Versus Angioplasty in Severe Ischaemia of the Limb (BASIL) Trial.
TLDR
Although AFS, OS, and LS were similar in the two groups, OSB was associated with significantly fewer MALE and re-interventions, adding further weight to the argument that, where possible, patients presenting with CLTI due to FP disease should be offered OSB as their primary revascularisation procedure. Expand
Design of the Revascularization With Open Bypass vs Angioplasty and Stenting of the Lower Extremity Trial (ROBUST): a randomized clinical trial.
TLDR
Providing level 1 evidence, ROBUST may help to establish guidelines for the treatment of superficial femoral artery lesions, eliminate unnecessary procedures, and reduce health care costs. Expand
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