Butterfly effects in mimicry? Combining signal and taste can twist the relationship of Müllerian co-mimics

@article{Ihalainen2008ButterflyEI,
  title={Butterfly effects in mimicry? Combining signal and taste can twist the relationship of M{\"u}llerian co-mimics},
  author={Eira Ihalainen and Leena Lindstr{\"o}m and Johanna Mappes and Sari Puolakkainen},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2008},
  volume={62},
  pages={1267-1276}
}
Müllerian co-mimics are aposematic species that resemble each other; sharing a warning signal is thought to be mutually beneficial for the co-mimics by reducing per capita predation risk. In Batesian mimicry, edible mimics avoid predation by resembling an aposematic model species. The protection of both the model and the mimic is weakened when the mimics are abundant compared to the models. The quasi-Batesian view suggests that defended (Müllerian) co-mimics, when unequal in their defences… Expand

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