Butterfly Wing Markings Are More Advantageous during Handling than during the Initial Strike of an Avian Predator.

@article{Wourms1985ButterflyWM,
  title={Butterfly Wing Markings Are More Advantageous during Handling than during the Initial Strike of an Avian Predator.},
  author={Mark K Wourms and Fred E. Wasserman},
  journal={Evolution; international journal of organic evolution},
  year={1985},
  volume={39 4},
  pages={845-851}
}
The "false head" hypothesis states that due to the posterior ventral wing markings of certain butterflies which resemble a "false head," visually hunting predators, such as birds, are deceived into attacking the hind wing area rather than the true head of the butterfly. In the laboratory, six groups of artificially marked dead cabbage butterflies, Pieris rapae, were presented to Blue Jays, Cyanocitta cristata. Of the six "false head" markings, only the eyespot significantly influenced the point… CONTINUE READING
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