Busy Places and Broken Windows? Toward Defining the Role of Physical Structure and Process in Community Crime Models

@article{Wilcox2004BusyPA,
  title={Busy Places and Broken Windows? Toward Defining the Role of Physical Structure and Process in Community Crime Models},
  author={Pamela Wilcox and Neil Quisenberry and Debra T. Cabrera and Shayne E Jones},
  journal={The Sociological Quarterly},
  year={2004},
  volume={45},
  pages={185 - 207}
}
Borrowing from the systemic model of social disorganization theory as well as from theories of human ecology and urban geography, we examine the effects of land use on community rates of violence and burglary. We posit that community crime is differentially affected by distinct nonresidential physical spaces in a neighborhood—distinct in terms of whether they are adult-centered, “business-oriented” public spaces versus spaces that are public yet still “resident centered,” especially toward… 
Neighborhood Effects on Crime in San Francisco: An Examination of Residential, Nonresidential, and “Mixed” Land Uses
ABSTRACT Communities and crime research presumes that purely nonresidential land uses are associated with more crime, whereas purely residential land use is associated with less crime. However, few
The elusive relationship between community organizations and crime: an assessment across disadvantaged areas of the South Bronx
Several theoretical perspectives posit a negative association between the extent of a neighborhood's organizational infrastructure and crime; yet, empirical support for this proposition has been
Physical Environment and Crime and Misconduct in Kentucky Schools
TLDR
This paper estimates random-intercept models using survey data from 3682 7th-grade students and 1351 teachers, nested within 65 Kentucky schools linked to school-level measures of the physical environment to determine how they affect various measures of school-based crime and misconduct.
Busy Businesses and Busy Contexts: The Distribution and Sources of Crime at Commercial Properties
Objective: Examine the distribution and sources of crime across freestanding businesses in San Antonio. We test hypotheses about the main and interactive effects of neighborhood and business
Criminal Justice Policy and Violent Crime in Socially Disorganized Neighborhoods: The Implications for Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Emphasizing the spatial distribution of crime, the theoretical model of social disorganization posits that crime and delinquency are related to the socioeconomic composition of communities. More
An Exploratory Examination of Social Ties and Crime in Mobile Home Communities
Guided by the systemic model of social disorganization, the purpose of this study was to explore the nature of social ties in mobile home communities and examine how that relates to rates of violent
Causal Relationship between Structural Characteristics of Metropolitan Neighborhoods and Homicide
This study attempted to test the causal effect of structural characteristics of metropolitan neighborhoods on crime, based on the ecological model of crime explanation. To this end, a Negative
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 69 REFERENCES
Local Social Ties in a Community and Crime Model: Questioning the Systemic Nature of Informal Social Control
Recent theoretical and empirical developments within social disorganization theory rely heavily on a systemic model of community attachment. It has been argued that poverty, heterogeneity, and
Systematic Social Observation of Public Spaces: A New Look at Disorder in Urban Neighborhoods1
This article assesses the sources and consequences of public disorder. Based on the videotaping and systematic rating of more than 23,000 street segments in Chicago, highly reliable scales of social
MACRO‐MICRO INTEGRATION IN THE STUDY OF VICTIMIZATION: A HIERARCHICAL LOGISTIC MODEL ANALYSIS ACROSS SEATTLE NEIGHBORHOODS*
Recent contextual analyses of victimization survey data are extended by application of hierarchical logistic model techniques. Using a multi-stage sample of 5,090 Seattle residents, we estimate
Community Structure and Crime: Testing Social-Disorganization Theory
Shaw and McKay's influential theory of community social disorganization has never been directly tested. To address this, a community-level theory that builds on Shaw and McKay's original model is
Ecological assessments of community disorder: Their relationship to fear of crime and theoretical implications
TLDR
Three ecological methods of measuring community disorder are presented and results linking different measure of disorder with fear, and individual and aggregated demographics with fear inform theories about fear of crime and extend research on the impact of community social and physical disorder.
FURTHERING THE INTEGRATION OF ROUTINE ACTIVITY AND SOCIAL DISORGANIZATION THEORIES: SMALL UNITS OF ANALYSIS AND THE STUDY OF STREET ROBBERY AS A DIFFUSION PROCESS
Attempts to integrate the two predominant spatial theories of crime, social disorganization and routine activity theories, may benefit from examining empirical relationships at units of analysis
Block Crime and Fear: Defensible Space, Local Social Ties, and Territorial Functioning
Why do some blocks have more crime, or their residents have higher fear levels, than other blocks? In an effort to answer this question we proposed a model that incorporated physical defensible space
Violent Crime and Alcohol Availability: Relationships in an Urban Community
TLDR
Findings suggest that alcohol outlets represent a form of “undesirable land use” in urban neighborhoods that are a manifestation of increasingly concentrated economic disadvantage in the United States.
Social Order and Disorder of Street Blocks and Neighborhoods: Ecology, Microecology, and the Systemic Model of Social Disorganization
Bursik and Grasmick's recently reformulated, ecologically oriented systemic model of neighborhood disorder explicitly recognizes three levels of informal social control: private (family and close
SOCIAL TIES AND CRIME: IS THE RELATIONSHIP GENDERED?*
A fundamental concept in the systemic model of social disorganization theory has been the social ties among neighbors. Theoretically, social ties among neighbors provide the foundation from which the
...
...