Burial of cowbird eggs by parasitized yellow warblers: an empirical and experimental study

@article{Sealy1995BurialOC,
  title={Burial of cowbird eggs by parasitized yellow warblers: an empirical and experimental study},
  author={Spencer George Sealy},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1995},
  volume={49},
  pages={877-889}
}
  • S. Sealy
  • Published 1 April 1995
  • Environmental Science, Biology
  • Animal Behaviour
Abstract The responses of yellow warblers,Dendroica petechia, to naturally laid and experimentally introduced eggs of the brown-headed cowbird,Molothrus ater, were recorded. Some female warblers accepted naturally laid cowbird eggs. Rejected eggs were usually buried, sometimes along with warbler egg(s). Yellow warblers more frequently buried cowbird eggs that were laid in their nests before their own clutches were initiated through the day on which they laid their second eggs. Warblers accepted… 
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