Bumblebees show cognitive flexibility by improving on an observed complex behavior

@article{Loukola2017BumblebeesSC,
  title={Bumblebees show cognitive flexibility by improving on an observed complex behavior},
  author={Olli J. Loukola and Clint J Perry and Louie Coscos and Lars Chittka},
  journal={Science},
  year={2017},
  volume={355},
  pages={833 - 836}
}
Very clever bees use tools One hallmark of cognitive complexity is the ability to manipulate objects with a specific goal in mind. Such “tool use” at one time was ascribed to humans alone, but then to primates, next to marine mammals, and later to birds. Now we recognize that many species have the capacity to envision how a particular object might be used to achieve an end. Loukola et al. extend this insight to invertebrates. Bumblebees were trained to see that a ball could be used to produce a… Expand
How foresight might support the behavioral flexibility of arthropods
TLDR
It is speculated that it may be simpler, in terms of the required evolutionary changes, computation and neural architecture, for arthropods to recognize their goal and predict the outcomes of their actions towards that goal, rather than having a large number of pre-programmed behaviors necessary to account for their observed behavioral flexibility. Expand
Innovation in solitary bees is driven by exploration, shyness and activity levels
TLDR
It is found that solitary bees can innovate, with 11 of 29 individuals being able to solve a new task consisting of lifting a lid to reach a reward, but the propensity to innovate was uncorrelated with learning capacity, but increased with exploration, boldness and activity. Expand
Innovation in solitary bees is driven by exploration, shyness and activity levels
TLDR
S solitary bees can innovate, with 11 of 29 individuals being able to solve a new task consisting in lifting a lid to reach a reward, and the propensity to innovate was uncorrelated with learning capacities, but increased with exploration, boldness and activity. Expand
Behavioral flexibility: A review, a model, and some exploratory tests
TLDR
Initial results showed that parametric manipulation can mimic some of the behavioral effects that have been attributed to flexibility, and modelled behavioral flexibility as a parameter in the function that transforms response strengths into observable response probabilities. Expand
Expanding Consciousness Bees and other insects show signs of possessing complex self-awareness , but if the scope of consciousness is widened , where will it end ?
Consciousness is a state of awareness that allows us to close our eyes and picture our childhood home, or to perform the sort of planning, prediction and risk assessment required to gauge whetherExpand
The frontiers of insect cognition
Insects have often been thought to display only the simplest forms of learning, but recent experimental studies, especially in social insects, have suggested various forms of sophisticated cognition.Expand
Insightful behaviour in arthropods?
Arthropod behaviour is usually explained through ‘hard-wired’ motor routines and learning abilities that have been favoured by natural selection. We describe observations in which two arthropodsExpand
Foraging bumblebees use social cues more when the task is difficult
TLDR
Foraging bumblebees are able to use social and personal information to optimize foraging decisions in a flexible way and prioritized social over personal information when flower discrimination was difficult and therefore the probability of making errors was higher. Expand
Honey bees zero in on the empty set
TLDR
On page 1124 of this issue, Howard et al. show that the honey bee belongs to the elite club of animals that comprehend the empty set as the conceptual precursor of the number zero. Expand
Putting the ecology back into insect cognition research
Abstract Over the past decades, research on insect cognition has made considerable advances in describing the ability of model species (in particular bees and fruit flies) to achieve cognitive tasksExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 17 REFERENCES
Associative Mechanisms Allow for Social Learning and Cultural Transmission of String Pulling in an Insect
TLDR
This work explored whether bumblebees can learn a nonnatural object manipulation task by using string pulling to access a reward that was presented out of reach and observed that there were several sequential sets (“generations”) of learners, suggesting that the key ingredients for the cultural spread of unusual skills are already in place and do not require sophisticated cognition. Expand
Complex operant learning by worker bumblebees (Bombus impatiens): detour behaviour and use of colours as discriminative stimuli
TLDR
It is demonstrated that bumblebees can learn novel, arbitrary behavioural sequences, manipulating and moving items in ways that seem far from any natural task that they would encounter, and doing so flexibly in response to specific discriminative stimuli. Expand
Operant Conditioning in Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L.): The Cap Pushing Response
TLDR
This manuscript offers a new method to explore operant conditioning in honey bees: the cap pushing response (CPR), which was used to test for difference in learning curves between novel auto-shaping and more traditional explicit-sh shaping. Expand
The concepts of ‘sameness’ and ‘difference’ in an insect
TLDR
It is shown that honeybees can form ‘sameness’ and ‘difference’ concepts, and not only can bees learn specific objects and their physical parameters, but they can also master abstract inter-relationships, such as sameness and difference. Expand
Can honey bees count landmarks?
TLDR
Honey bees were trained along a row of four identical landmarks which were equally spaced in a set-up 300 m long, the feeder being placed between the third and fourth landmarks. Expand
Social Learning in Insects — From Miniature Brains to Consensus Building
TLDR
A spectrum of social information usage in insects is reviewed--from inadvertently provided cues to signals shaped by selection specifically for information transfer to pinpoint the sensory modalities involved and, in some cases, quantify the adaptive benefits. Expand
Are Bigger Brains Better?
TLDR
Neural network analyses show that cognitive features found in insects, such as numerosity, attention and categorisation-like processes, may require only very limited neuron numbers, suggesting that brain size may have less of a relationship with behavioural repertoire and cognitive capacity than generally assumed. Expand
Observational Conditioning in Flower Choice Copying by Bumblebees (Bombus terrestris): Influence of Observer Distance and Demonstrator Movement
TLDR
Bumblebees possess the capacity to learn the quality of a flower by distal observation of other foragers’ choices, confirming that social learning in bees involves more advanced processes than simple associative learning, and indicates that observational conditioning might be widespread in pollinating insects. Expand
Cognition with few neurons: higher-order learning in insects
  • M. Giurfa
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Trends in Neurosciences
  • 2013
TLDR
This work focuses on capabilities such as attentional modulation and concept learning and discusses their mechanistic bases, with the goal of uncovering the basic neural architectures underlying cognitive processing in insects. Expand
Conspecific and Heterospecific Information Use in Bumblebees
TLDR
The findings demonstrate that social learning is not a unique process limited to conspecifics and that through associative learning, interspecifically sourced information can be just as valuable as that provided by conspecial individuals. Expand
...
1
2
...