Bumblebee vulnerability and conservation world-wide

@article{Williams2011BumblebeeVA,
  title={Bumblebee vulnerability and conservation world-wide},
  author={Paul H Williams and Juliet L. Osborne},
  journal={Apidologie},
  year={2011},
  volume={40},
  pages={367-387}
}
We review evidence from around the world for bumblebee declines and review management to mitigate threats. We find that there is evidence that some bumblebee species are declining in Europe, North America, and Asia. People believe that land-use changes may be having a negative effect through reductions in food plants in many parts of the world, but that other factors such as pathogens may be having a stronger effect for a few species in some regions (especially for Bombus s. str. in North… Expand

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