Bulking agents, antispasmodics and antidepressants for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.

@article{Ruepert2011BulkingAA,
  title={Bulking agents, antispasmodics and antidepressants for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.},
  author={Lisa Ruepert and A. Quartero and N. D. de Wit and G. J. van der Heijden and G. Rubin and J. Muris},
  journal={The Cochrane database of systematic reviews},
  year={2011},
  volume={8},
  pages={
          CD003460
        }
}
BACKGROUND Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic gastrointestinal disorder. The role of pharmacotherapy for IBS is limited and focused mainly on symptom control. OBJECTIVES The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the efficacy of bulking agents, antispasmodics and antidepressants for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. SEARCH STRATEGY Computer assisted structured searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane library, CINAHL and PsychInfo were conducted for the… Expand

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