Building a cell cycle oscillator: hysteresis and bistability in the activation of Cdc2

@article{Pomerening2003BuildingAC,
  title={Building a cell cycle oscillator: hysteresis and bistability in the activation of Cdc2},
  author={Joseph R. Pomerening and Eduardo Sontag and James E. Ferrell},
  journal={Nature Cell Biology},
  year={2003},
  volume={5},
  pages={346-351}
}
In the early embryonic cell cycle, Cdc2–cyclin B functions like an autonomous oscillator, whose robust biochemical rhythm continues even when DNA replication or mitosis is blocked. At the core of the oscillator is a negative feedback loop; cyclins accumulate and produce active mitotic Cdc2–cyclin B; Cdc2 activates the anaphase-promoting complex (APC); the APC then promotes cyclin degradation and resets Cdc2 to its inactive, interphase state. Cdc2 regulation also involves positive feedback, with… 

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