Buffered Development: Resilience after Aggressive Subordination in Infancy

@article{Drummond2003BufferedDR,
  title={Buffered Development: Resilience after Aggressive Subordination in Infancy},
  author={Hugh Drummond and Roxana Torres and V. V. Krishnan},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={2003},
  volume={161},
  pages={794 - 807}
}
Do aggressive dominance and subordination in vertebrate broods and litters affect development? We examined 1,167 fledglings from two‐chick broods of the blue‐footed booby (Sula nebouxii), a species in which the first‐hatched chick dominates with violent attacks throughout the nestling period and subordinates suffer lower fledging success, but if both broodmates survive, they grow to the same size. There was little evidence that dominant fledglings were more likely to recruit into the breeding… 
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  • H. Drummond
  • Biology, Psychology
    The Quarterly Review of Biology
  • 2006
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An evolutionary framework in which the species‐typical dominance relationship is determined by feeding mode, confinement, cost of subordination, and capacity for individual recognition, can be extended to mammalian litters and account for the aggression‐submission and aggression‐resistance observed in distinct populations of spotted hyenas.
Severely stressful natal environment does not impact lifetime reproductive success of adult boobies
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Lifetime philopatry in the blue-footed booby: a longitudinal study
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Throughout the early lifetime, males and females nested closer to their first breeding sites than to their natal sites, and comparison with a simulation of successive breeding dispersals in random directions showed that male and female blue-footed boobies are philopatric to the first breeding site.
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