Buffalo Soldiers as Guardians of the Parks: African‐American Troops in the California National Parks in the Early Twentieth Century

@article{Mason2019BuffaloSA,
  title={Buffalo Soldiers as Guardians of the Parks: African‐American Troops in the California National Parks in the Early Twentieth Century},
  author={Kathy S. Mason},
  journal={The Historian},
  year={2019},
  volume={81},
  pages={84 - 98}
}
  • K. Mason
  • Published 1 March 2019
  • History
  • The Historian
In late May of 1903, Troops I and M of the 9 U.S. Cavalry, under the command of Captain Charles Young, left the Presidio in San Francisco, California, for their summer assignment. In sixteen days, these men traveled over three hundred miles to arrive at their final destination: Sequoia National Park. During the next few weeks, these soldiers would engage in park development and construction projects, patrol for poachers, stray livestock, and fires, and serve as guides for tourists in both… 
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References

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Concerning a July 1903 Fire Near the Boundary of Yosemite National Park

    Troops Leave Wawona: Soldier Guardians of the National Park Forsake Posts for Winter

    • the California Digital Newspaper Collection

    Report of the Acting Superintendent of Yosemite Park

    • Government Printing Office)
    • 1904

    Camp Wood is named for Captain Abram E. Wood, the first Acting Superintendent of Yosemite National Park and commander of Troop I, 4 th Cavalry