Buddhism and breastfeeding.

@article{Segawa2008BuddhismAB,
  title={Buddhism and breastfeeding.},
  author={M. Segawa},
  journal={Breastfeeding medicine : the official journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine},
  year={2008},
  volume={3 2},
  pages={
          124-8
        }
}
  • M. Segawa
  • Published 2008
  • Medicine
  • Breastfeeding medicine : the official journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine
Buddhism is an ancient religion that began in India and spread throughout Asia. It is prevalent in modern Japan. Breastfeeding has been a strong practice for centuries with the custom being to continue until the child is 6 or 7 years of age. The Edo period was very influential in establishing breastfeeding customs that continue today. 

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