Corpus ID: 237485303

Bubble Clustering in Cosmological First Order Phase Transitions

@inproceedings{Pirvu2021BubbleCI,
  title={Bubble Clustering in Cosmological First Order Phase Transitions},
  author={Dalila M. Pirvu and Jonathan Braden and Matthew C. Johnson},
  year={2021}
}
Dalila P̂ırvu, 2, ∗ Jonathan Braden, † and Matthew C. Johnson 4, ‡ Perimeter Institute, 31 Caroline Street North, Waterloo, ON, N2L 2Y5, Canada Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, N2L 3G1 Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H8, Canada Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, ON, M3J 1P3, Canada (Dated: September 13, 2021) 

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