Brood parasitism by Common Hawk-Cuckoo (Hierococcyx varius Vahl.)

@article{Prasad2001BroodPB,
  title={Brood parasitism by Common Hawk-Cuckoo (Hierococcyx varius Vahl.)},
  author={G. Prasad and Paingamadathil Ommer Nameer and Manna Reshmi},
  journal={Zoos' Print Journal},
  year={2001},
  volume={16},
  pages={554-556}
}
The Indian Hawk-Cuckoo (Hierococcyx varius Vahl.) was found to be a brood parasite on Pale-capped Babbler, Turdoides affinis (Jerdon) in Kerala Agricultural University (KAU) Campus, Thrissur. The chances of babbler nests parasitised by cuckoos is maximum when they build nests on open-crowned and exposed trees at heights more than 5m. However, the nest building materials and the flock size of the babbler family did not influence the cuckoo in selecting the host. The study also indicates that the… 
2 Citations
Avian brood parasitism by Common hawk cuckoo (Hierococcyx varius) and Jacobin cuckoo (Clamator jacobinus) in Bangladesh
TLDR
The Jungle babbler (Turdoides striata) has been mentioned as host of the Common hawk cuckoo (Hierococcyx varius), one of the most widely distributed cuckoos also known as ‘brain fever bird’ in the Indian sub-continent.
Brood Parasitism in Asian Cuckoos: Different Aspects of Interactions between Cuckoos and their Hosts in Bangladesh
TLDR
It is found that koel eggs were highly non-mimetic to those of common myna and long-tailed shrike, but showed good mimicry to house crow eggs, while cuckoo eggs showed excellent egg mimicry with the eggs of their black drongo hosts, as did common hawk cuckoos and piedcuckoos with their jungle babbler host.

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TLDR
The general character of “The Fauna of British India” is so well known, and has been so frequently commented on, that it is only necessary to say that the present half-volume is similar to those which have preceded it, and that the high character of the series is fully maintained.
The Book of Indian Birds
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