Brood Parasitic Cowbird Nestlings Use Host Young to Procure Resources

@article{Kilner2004BroodPC,
  title={Brood Parasitic Cowbird Nestlings Use Host Young to Procure Resources},
  author={R. Kilner and J. Madden and M. Hauber},
  journal={Science},
  year={2004},
  volume={305},
  pages={877 - 879}
}
  • R. Kilner, J. Madden, M. Hauber
  • Published 2004
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Science
  • Young brood parasites that tolerate the company of host offspring challenge the existing evolutionary view of family life. In theory, all parasitic nestlings should be ruthlessly self-interested and should kill host offspring soon after hatching. Yet many species allow host young to live, even though they are rivals for host resources. Here we show that the tolerance of host nestlings by the parasitic brown-headed cowbird Molothrus ater is adaptive. Host young procure the cowbird a higher… CONTINUE READING
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