Broken barriers: Human‐induced changes to gene flow and introgression in animals

@article{Crispo2011BrokenBH,
  title={Broken barriers: Human‐induced changes to gene flow and introgression in animals},
  author={E. Crispo and Jean-S{\'e}bastien Moore and J. Lee-Yaw and S. M. Gray and B. C. Haller},
  journal={BioEssays},
  year={2011},
  volume={33}
}
We identify two processes by which humans increase genetic exchange among groups of individuals: by affecting the distribution of groups and dispersal patterns across a landscape, and by affecting interbreeding among sympatric or parapatric groups. Each of these processes might then have two different effects on biodiversity: changes in the number of taxa through merging or splitting of groups, and the extinction/extirpation of taxa through effects on fitness. We review the various ways in… Expand

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