Broken Limits to Life Expectancy

@article{Oeppen2002BrokenLT,
  title={Broken Limits to Life Expectancy},
  author={James Oeppen and James W. Vaupel},
  journal={Science},
  year={2002},
  volume={296},
  pages={1029 - 1031}
}
Is human life expectancy approaching its limit? Many--including individuals planning their retirement and officials responsible for health and social policy--believe it is, but the evidence presented in the Policy Forum suggests otherwise. For 160 years, best-performance life expectancy has steadily increased by a quarter of a year per year, an extraordinary constancy of human achievement. Mortality experts have repeatedly asserted that life expectancy is close to an ultimate ceiling; these… Expand
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