Broca aphasia

@article{Mohr1978BrocaA,
  title={Broca aphasia},
  author={Jay Preston Mohr and Michael S. Pessin and S Finkelstein and H. Harris Funkenstein and Gary W. Duncan and Kenneth R. Davis},
  journal={Neurology},
  year={1978},
  volume={28},
  pages={311 - 311}
}
The speech disturbance resulting from infarction limited to the Broca area has been delineated; it differs from the speech disorder called Broca aphasia, which results from damage extending far outside the Broca area. Nor does Broca area infarction cause Broca aphasia. The lesions in 20 cases observed since 1972 were documented by autopsy, computerized tomography, or arteriogram; the autopsy records from the Massachusetts General hospital for the past 20 years and the published cases since 1820… 

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Clinical and anatomic data is gathered on four patients with this dysarthria without aphasia, caused by small lesions of the motor system for articulation: pars opercularis, inferior prerolandic gyrus, or white matter deep to those regions.
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It is concluded that the left inferior precentral gyrus plays an important role not only in articulation but also in writing, and that this area is a more critical zone for Broca's aphasia than the foot of the left third frontal gyrus.
Ischemia in Broca Area Is Associated With Broca Aphasia More Reliably in Acute Than in Chronic Stroke
TLDR
The results indicate that the acute aphasia syndrome may allow the clinician to predict the compromised vascular territory, even when structural imaging shows only a small (or no) infarct.
Crossed cerebellar diaschisis in chronic Broca's aphasia
TLDR
Patients with chronic Broca's aphasia with crossed cerebellar diaschisis but patients without CCD did not have hat infarcts involving the lower part of the frontal gyrus, which suggests that this region may have functional and anatomical connections with the cerebellum.
Broca 失語の諸症状の病巣 (1) : 構音の障害と語健忘について
As it become appreciated that the disruption restricted to the third frontal gyrus does not produce Broca's aphasia, the lesion localization responsible for the occurrence of Broca's aphasia is,
Participation of the Insula in Language
Since the beginning of aphasia history, it has been known that the insula has a crucial role in language. The interest in the insula somehow decreased during the twentieth century, because it has not
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