Broca's area and the language instinct

@article{Musso2003BrocasAA,
  title={Broca's area and the language instinct},
  author={Mariacristina Musso and Andrea Moro and Volkmar Glauche and Michel Rijntjes and J{\"u}rgen R. Reichenbach and Christian B{\"u}chel and Cornelius Weiller},
  journal={Nature Neuroscience},
  year={2003},
  volume={6},
  pages={774-781}
}
Language acquisition in humans relies on abilities like abstraction and use of syntactic rules, which are absent in other animals. The neural correlate of acquiring new linguistic competence was investigated with two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. German native speakers learned a sample of 'real' grammatical rules of different languages (Italian or Japanese), which, although parametrically different, follow the universal principles of grammar (UG). Activity during this… 
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