Broad North Atlantic distribution of a meiobenthic annelid – against all odds

@article{Worsaae2019BroadNA,
  title={Broad North Atlantic distribution of a meiobenthic annelid – against all odds},
  author={K. Worsaae and Alexandra Kerbl and {\'A}. Vang and Brett C Gonzalez},
  journal={Scientific Reports},
  year={2019},
  volume={9}
}
DNA barcoding and population genetic studies have revealed an unforeseen hidden diversity of cryptic species among microscopic marine benthos, otherwise exhibiting highly similar and simple morphologies. This has led to a paradigm shift, rejecting cosmopolitism of marine meiofauna until genetically proven and challenging the “Everything is Everywhere, but the environment selects” hypothesis that claims ubiquitous distribution of microscopic organisms. With phylogenetic and species delimitation… Expand
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