British Illustrated Editions of “Uncle Tom's Cabin”: Race, Working-Class Literacy, and Transatlantic Reprinting in the 1850s

@article{Holohan2011BritishIE,
  title={British Illustrated Editions of “Uncle Tom's Cabin”: Race, Working-Class Literacy, and Transatlantic Reprinting in the 1850s},
  author={Marianne Holohan},
  journal={Resources for American Literary Study},
  year={2011}
}
  • Marianne Holohan
  • Published 1 January 2011
  • History
  • Resources for American Literary Study
Many cheap illustrated editions of Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin were brought out by reprint publishers in Britain in 1852 and 1853. While much scholarship about the novel's publication focuses on America, more copies of Uncle Tom's Cabin were sold in Britain, thanks to a laissez-faire publishing atmosphere that allowed reprinting to flourish and an expanded reading public that included the working classes. Most British editions of the novel were cheap editions intended for a mass… 
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