Bristle-like integumentary structures at the tail of the horned dinosaur Psittacosaurus

@article{Mayr2002BristlelikeIS,
  title={Bristle-like integumentary structures at the tail of the horned dinosaur Psittacosaurus},
  author={Gerald Mayr and Stefan D. Peters and Gerhard Plodowski and Olaf Vogel},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={2002},
  volume={89},
  pages={361-365}
}
Abstract. A specimen of the horned dinosaur Psittacosaurus from the early Cretaceous of China is described in which the integument is extraordinarily well-preserved. Most unusual is the presence of long bristle-like structures on the proximal part of tail. We interpret these structures as cylindrical and possibly tubular epidermal structures that were anchored deeply in the skin. They might have been used in display behavior and especially if one assumes that they were colored, they may have… 
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