Bringing Home the Atomic World: Quantum Mysteries for Anybody.

@article{Mermin1981BringingHT,
  title={Bringing Home the Atomic World: Quantum Mysteries for Anybody.},
  author={N. Mermin},
  journal={American Journal of Physics},
  year={1981},
  volume={49},
  pages={940-943}
}
  • N. Mermin
  • Published 1981
  • Physics
  • American Journal of Physics
A simple device is described, based on a version of Bell’s inequality, whose operation directly demonstrates some of the most peculiar behavior to be found in the atomic world. To understand the design of the device one has to know some physics, but the extraordinary implications of its behavior should be evident to anyone. Except for a preface and appendix for physicists, the paper is addressed to the general reader. 
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