• Corpus ID: 40420193

Bring Your Own Data Workshops: A Mechanism to Aid Data Owners to Comply with Linked Data Best Practices

@inproceedings{Roos2014BringYO,
  title={Bring Your Own Data Workshops: A Mechanism to Aid Data Owners to Comply with Linked Data Best Practices},
  author={Marco Roos and Alasdair J. G. Gray and Andra Waagmeester and Mark Thompson and Rajaram Kaliyaperumal and Eelke van der Horst and Barend Mons and Mark D. Wilkinson},
  booktitle={SWAT4LS},
  year={2014}
}
In the context of stimulating data owners to make data ‘FAIR’ (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable), we have developed the concept of the ‘Bring Your Own Data workshop’ (BYOD) for FAIR data. In a BYOD that focuses particularly on a Linked Data (LD) approach, engineers or bioinformaticians who are experts on their own data sources work with LD experts to generate Linked Data on a preselected set of data from their own resource. We report here on the organisation of a BYOD and on our… 
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