Brief Report: Should the DSM V Drop Asperger Syndrome?

@article{Ghaziuddin2010BriefRS,
  title={Brief Report: Should the DSM V Drop Asperger Syndrome?},
  author={Mohammad Ghaziuddin},
  journal={Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders},
  year={2010},
  volume={40},
  pages={1146-1148}
}
  • M. Ghaziuddin
  • Published 12 February 2010
  • Psychology
  • Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
The DSM IV defines Asperger syndrome (AS) as a pervasive developmental (autistic spectrum) disorder characterized by social deficits and rigid focused interests in the absence of language impairment and cognitive delay. Since its inclusion in the DSM-IV, there has been a dramatic increase in its recognition both in children and adults. However, because studies have generally failed to demonstrate a clear distinction between AS and autism, some researchers have called for its elimination from… 
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BackgroundIt has long been debated whether Asperger’s Syndrome (ASP) should be considered part of the Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) or whether it constitutes a unique entity. The Diagnostic and
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