Branching Brownian motion seen from its tip

@article{Adkon2011BranchingBM,
  title={Branching Brownian motion seen from its tip},
  author={Elie A{\"i}d{\'e}kon and Julien Berestycki and {\'E}ric Brunet and Z. Shi},
  journal={Probability Theory and Related Fields},
  year={2011},
  volume={157},
  pages={405-451}
}
It has been conjectured since the work of Lalley and Sellke (Ann. Probab., 15, 1052–1061, 1987) that branching Brownian motion seen from its tip (e.g. from its rightmost particle) converges to an invariant point process. Very recently, it emerged that this can be proved in several different ways (see e.g. Brunet and Derrida, A branching random walk seen from the tip, 2010, Poissonian statistics in the extremal process of branching Brownian motion, 2010; Arguin et al., The extremal process of… 

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As a first step toward a characterization of the limiting extremal process of branching Brownian motion, we proved in a recent work [Comm. Pure Appl. Math. 64 (2011) 1647-1676] that, in the limit of
Convergence in Law for the Branching Random Walk Seen from Its Tip
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